News: Two in three say workplace surveillance culture would discourage them from working for an organization

Workforce Management System

Two in three say workplace surveillance culture would discourage them from working for an organization

Almost half (48%) said that if an organization was unclear about or unwilling to disclose the surveillance methods they used, they would be less likely to want to work for that organization.
Two in three say workplace surveillance culture would discourage them from working for an organization

Surveillance and online security blog Online Spy Shop polled 2,000 adults on their attitudes to and perceptions of workplace monitoring and surveillance, with a specific focus on 'non-standard' methods, discounting standard methods of tracking such as keycard access and CCTV.

Almost half (48%) said that if an organization was unclear about or unwilling to disclose the surveillance methods they used, they would be less likely to want to work for that organization. And two thirds (64%) said disclosure of 'non-standard' workplace surveillance methods such as facial recognition technology and mandatory health tracking would discourage them from seeking employment with that organization.

Of the two thirds who said that an organization's approach to surveillance and monitoring could negatively affect their perceptions, the largest deterrent was the use of facial recognition technology. 80% said that facial recognition would be a serious deterrent.

The second largest cause for concern was sleep tracking through wearable tech, which is increasing in popularity. Other deterrents for potential employees were sleep tracking, keystroke monitoring, health tracking and location tracking.

Attitudes to surveillance varied considerably depending on whether the surveillance is optional or mandatory. When surveillance was offered as an optional aid, for example like sleep tracking and health monitoring, participants were significantly less likely to be put off.

A spokesperson for Online Spy Shop said: "Employees are used to a degree of surveillance perceive measures such as CCTV and logged keycard entry as fairly standard. Some employees, especially younger workers, are comfortable with optional, performance-related monitoring, such as wearable health and activity tracking. Where they start to object is when terms and conditions are unclear, or if the surveillance is non-standard and mandatory, for example, the use of facial recognition technology. Arbitrary monitoring rightly arouses suspicion and could be denying organizations access to the best talent."

 

About the research

Essential Content polled 2,000 adults based in the UK, USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Africa, France and The Netherlands between the dates of July 31, 2019 and August 4, 2019.

Pic source- Pinterest 

Topics: Workforce Management System

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