News: What's the state of skills in 2021? Here are top predictions by Degreed

Skilling

What's the state of skills in 2021? Here are top predictions by Degreed

Upskilling your workforce is a matter of survival. Here is some data to map your skilling needs.
What's the state of skills in 2021? Here are top predictions by Degreed

Massive workforce shifts in 2020 have forced countless workers to refresh their current skills — and build new ones. If you’re wondering what skills are critical to you moving into 2021, it depends entirely on who you are, where you work, and what you do.

Degreed has recently launched a report State of Skills 2021: Endangered, where they have organized the data according to the country, industry, and job role to help identify where skills are most at-risk of becoming obsolete. The study that surveyed 5,000+ workers, team managers, and business leaders, it was observed that the demand is strongest for technological skills. However, the participants in the survey are also looking to develop their social and cognitive skills.

Here are some key insights from the report, according to different geographies:

USA

  • Workers here are worried about COVID-19 impacts on learning. A significant proportion (36%) say it’s accelerated the need to acquire new skills
  • Likewise, (36%) say employers have reduced upskilling opportunities compared to pre-COVID levels.
  • As they look ahead, US workers are relatively confident. Only 12%, the least in our survey, think their skills will be obsolete within 12 months.
  • That said, workers here (68%) are the most likely to be stressed when they don’t feel confident in their skills. And 42% say a lack of confidence in skills triggers mental health issues.
  • While workers here are feeling better than those elsewhere about COVID-19 and the long-term value of their existing skills, US employers shouldn’t disregard workers’ concerns outright. Employers should take a hard look at how skill-building can reduce workforce stress.

UK

  • Workers here aren’t as worried about COVID-19. Relatively few (37%) say their employers have reduced upskilling opportunities compared to pre-COVID levels. They’re not too worried about acquiring new skills either. Only 37% say they’re concerned that COVID-19 has accelerated the need.
  • That said, 26% don’t think the most up-to-date information about their skills can be found anywhere — the lowest proportion anywhere in our survey.
  • Workers here still seem to value learning in general. A significant number (41%) said they’re likely to leave their jobs if their employers don’t invest in their development.
  • A sizable proportion (35%) say tasks take longer to complete when they don't feel confident in their skills.
  • The bottom line is that UK employers here would be wise to invest in skill-building to boost employee confidence, morale, and retention.

INDIA

  • The pressure to develop new skills as a result of COVID-19 is strongest here. A whopping 72% of workers here say it’s accelerated the need. Likewise, an equal proportion of workers, the highest in our survey, say COVID-19 has reduced upskilling opportunities.
  • People feel vulnerable. Concern among workers that their skills will be obsolete within the next 12 months is strongest here (51%).
  • Workers here (at 64%) are the most likely to leave their jobs if their employers don’t invest in their skill development.
  • And workers here more than anywhere else (68%)  say employers are more likely to make redundancies than re-skill workers or move them to other departments.
  • The bottom line? All this points to a critical need. Employers in India can help their people overcome deep-seated concerns about the future by quickly embracing new skill-building strategies.

AUSTRALIA

  • Workers here are concerned about the effects of COVID-19. A significant proportion (42%) say their employers have reduced upskilling and development opportunities compared to pre-COVID levels. And an equal proportion say it’s accelerated the need to learn new skills.
  • Likewise, people feel vulnerable. A significant proportion of workers here (31%) say their core job skills will be obsolete in five years.
  • A large majority (62%) say their jobs get more stressful when they don’t have confidence in their skills.
  • And nearly half (42%) say they’re more likely to leave their jobs if their employers don’t invest in their development.
  • The bottom line? Australians are uneasy, and employers could do a lot to mitigate stress and concerns about the future by investing in new skill-building strategies.

MEXICO

  • In this emerging market, lack of opportunity is serious. A majority of workers (56%) say their employers reduced upskilling compared to pre-COVID levels.
  • Likewise, a majority (56%) say that COVID has accelerated the need to acquire new skills.
  • This comes as people are worried about staying up to date. More than a third think their core skills will be obsolete within 12 months. And a majority (52%) say their core skills will be obsolete in three years.
  • There is a bright spot. Workers feel good about their companies’ HR systems. In fact, 42%, the most in our survey, are confident in the skills data stored in these solutions.
  • The bottom line? Mexican employers should lean into worker confidence in HR systems and provide workers with the new skill-building opportunities they crave.

BRAZIL

  • In this emerging market, lack of opportunity is serious. A large majority of workers (62%) say their employers reduced upskilling compared to pre-COVID levels.
  • This comes amid strong pressure to build new skills. Workers (62%) say COVID-19 has accelerated the need.
  • In addition, a lack of confidence seems to be hampering productivity. Almost half of workers (49%) say tasks take longer to complete when they don’t feel confident in their skills.
  • Likewise, 41% say their work quality suffers when they lack confidence.
  • The bottom line? People want to learn. About half of workers here (47%) say they’re likely to leave their jobs if their Brazilian employers don't invest in their development. 

FRANCE

  • A significant proportion of workers here (39%) say that their employers reduced upskilling opportunities compared to pre-COVID levels. And they’re worried about acquiring new skills. A large number (39%) say COVID-19 has accelerated the need.
  • People here worry about stress. Nearly half (49%) say work gets more stressful when they aren’t confident in their skills.
  • People want to learn. Nearly half (48%) say they’re likely to leave their jobs if their employers don’t invest in their development.
  • One bright spot: Workers here (39%) are relatively confident their employers have the most up-to-date data on their skills.
  • The bottom line? French employers could safeguard employee retention and help workers combat stress through new development opportunities.

GERMANY

  • People here are concerned about COVID-19. A significant proportion (41%) say their employers have reduced upskilling and development opportunities compared to pre-COVID levels.An equal number say it’s accelerated the need to learn new skills.
  • Likewise, people feel vulnerable. A majority of workers here (56%) say their core job skills will be obsolete in five years.
  • Half of respondents (50%) say their job gets more stressful when they don’t have confidence in their skills.
  • And more than a third (36%) saying they’re more likely to leave their jobs if their employers don’t invest in their development.
  • The bottom line? German employer investment in workforce development could help ease people’s concerns about the pandemic, stress, and their own skill proficiencies.
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Topics: Skilling

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